The attached guidance document describes important adjustments to the EMS-to-Hospital Response Process for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) that went into effect on August 1, 2016. The changes apply to all 911-receiving hospitals in New York City. On the same date, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) began using a four-level categorization system for MCIs, which are defined as producing or having the potential to produce five or more patients. EMS patient transport decisions are informed by the MCI level, which also provides hospitals with additional situational awareness. Each MCI level is associated with a predetermined number of critical and non-critical patients that hospitals should be prepared to receive.  The attached guidance document describes important adjustments to the EMS-to-Hospital Response Process for Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) that went into effect on August 1, 2016. The changes apply to all 911-receiving hospitals in New York City. On the same date, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) began using a four-level categorization system for MCIs, which are defined as producing or having the potential to produce five or more patients. EMS patient transport decisions are informed by the MCI level, which also provides hospitals with additional situational awareness. Each MCI level is associated with a predetermined number of critical and non-critical patients that hospitals should be prepared to receive.

A workgroup jointly led by FDNY and GNYHA developed the revised EMS-to-Hospital Response Process for MCIs in early 2016. Since August 2016, the workgroup has been meeting to monitor the process and identify areas for improvement. As a result, several small adjustments have been made to the original process, each of which is outlined in the attached guidance document.

The adjustments include:

  • Changes to fixed allotments for freestanding emergency departments
  • Pediatric considerations
  • Detailed information about the notification calls made to emergency departments
  • Clarification regarding how a single MCI may impact hospitals differently

The attached document is designed to advise New York City 911-receiving hospitals that are considering changes to internal procedures that this MCI response process may warrant.  Hospitals are encouraged to integrate internal procedures related to this process within their broader mass casualty response plan.

GNYHA recently hosted a training session to help emergency department frontline staff to prepare for MCI responses. Materials and resources from the session are available here.

Please contact Jenna Mandel-Ricci with any questions about the attachment or other materials referenced above.