A commission created to examine the issue of publicly financed elections is striving to complete its work by December 1. Such a system would presumably match small-dollar contributions and limit contributions, similar to New York City’s rules. The commission’s recommendations will become law if the Legislature does not return to Albany in December to reject or alter them.

The commission is also considering changes to fusion voting, which allows candidates to run on multiple party lines. Nassau County Democratic Chair Jay Jacobs, a commission member, has floated a proposal that would require parties to win 250,000 votes to stay on the ballot. That number is currently 50,000. Minor parties are concerned such a change could imperil their existence, and a group of legislators recently sent a letter to support fusion voting.